Category Archives: Northeast US Events

The Postcolonial Contemporary: Political Imaginaries for the Global Present

6:00pm – 7:30pm
30 October 2018
NYU Center for the Humanities, Fifth Floor
RSVP here

In twelve essays that draw from a number of disciplines—history, anthropology, literature, geography, indigenous studies— and regional locations (the Black Atlantic, South Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Australia, Argentina) The Postcolonial Contemporary (Fordham UP, 2018) seeks to move beyond the habitual oppositions that have often characterized the field: universal vs. particular; Marxism vs. postcolonialism; politics vs. culture. The essays reckon with new and persisting postcolonial predicaments, doing so under four interrelated analytics: postcolonial temporality; deprovincializing the global south; beyond Marxism versus postcolonial studies; and postcolonial spatiality and new political imaginaries.

Join us to celebrate this new volume and to reflect on the project with the book’s editors, Jini Kim Watson and Gary Wilder, and several contributors.

Featuring:

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[ Decodings ] exhibit by Pascale Monnin

Exhibit Opening 
4:00pm – 9:00pm
2 November 2018
Rogue Space #9 E-F-G
508-526 West 26th Street
Between 10 & 11th Avenue
Chelsea, NY 10001

RSVP for the opening: info@galeriemonnin.com

The exhibit will be on view from Saturday November 3rd to Saturday November 10th Open every day from 10am to 6pm.

Pascale Monnin last exhibited in Manhattan 5 years ago. This November, she returns to the city with [Decodings], a solo exhibit organized by GALERIE MONNIN NYC.

[ Decodings ], both a celebration of the world and an evidence of Monnin’s estrangement from it, presents more than a hundred paintings, mobiles and sculptures. Punctuated by Monnin’s obsessions: history, politics, debt, myths, complexity, animals, plants, life, childhood, time, movement, the sacred, faces, vertigo…, it reveals many facets of her artwork and displays a world of warring births, dazzling impulses, hybrid forms, with reckless nuances of a childhood spreading sometimes cast in stone, sometimes lying on the frame as the art spills over.

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Queer Trouble in Caribbean Art & Activism

A Conversation with Rosamond S. King & Angelique V. Nixon

6:00pm – 8:00pm
23 October 2018
Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality (CSGS)
285 Mercer Street, 4th Floor


Rosamond S. King, English, Brooklyn College, City University of New York


Angelique V. Nixon, Institute for Gender & Development Studies, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad

Two award winning artist-scholars reflect on the intersections of LGBTQI and feminist arts, activism, and politics in the Caribbean. King and Nixon address how their own work moves between these different registers. They also discuss how they see contemporary queer Caribbean performance, literature, and visual art engage and resist the ongoing violences of colonial and postcolonial histories, and how these works offer us vibrant models of desire, embodiment, and collectivity.

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Roxane Gay in Conversation with Katia D. Ulysse

7:00pm
8 November 2018
CUNY Graduate Center 


Roxane Gay

Roxane Gay, award-winning author of Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body (2017), Difficult Women (2017), and Bad Feminist (2014) and Katia D. Ulysse, Haitian poet, essayist and author of Drifting (2014), among other works, will join us for a reading and conversation in the Critical Caribbean Feminisms series. Following the reading, Gay, Ulysse, and BCRW Associate Director Tami Navarro will discuss various forms of writing–including novels, memoir, and social media interventions–and examine how these create space for conversations around and advocacy for social justice.


Katia  D. Ulysse

This event is free and open to the public. All advance tickets have been claimed. A limited number of tickets will be available and released on a first-come, first-seated basis. For more information, visit the CUNY Grad Center event page.

Event Co-Sponsors: Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism, the Center for the Study of Women and Society, CUNY Graduate Center, the Society of Fellows in the Humanities and the Heyman Center for the Humanities, Columbia University, and Women Writing Women’s Lives

About the Speakers Continue reading

Reimagining Money Workshop and Caribbean Syllabus Launch

4:00pm – 6:00pm
10 October 2018
754 Schermerhorn Ext
Columbia University

The Center for the Study of Social Difference (CSSD) working group Unpayable Debt: Capital, Violence, and the New Global Economy presents: Caribbean Syllabus: Second Edition and Max Haiven’s Art After Money, Money After Art Book Launch with: Tao Goffe, Monica Jiménez, Sarah Muir, Frances Negron-Muntaner, and Jason Wozniak.

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Panel Discussions and the “Lydia Cabrera and Édouard Glissant: Trembling Thinking” Exhibition

4:00pm
9 October 2018
Room 1527, North Building
Hunter College, CUNY
Free Admission

Opening Panel:
To mark the opening of Lydia Cabrera and Édouard Glissant: Trembling Thinking, cocurators Hans Ulrich Obrist and Asad Raza, along with artist Julie Mehretu, will discuss Americas Society’s new exhibition in a panel moderated by Gabriela Rangel.


Image: Lydia Cabrera (second from right) with a group of informants, Central Cuba, undated. Cuban Heritage Collection at the University of Miami Libraries, Coral Gables, Florida.

6:00pm – 8:30pm
9 October 2018
Americas Society
680 Park Avenue,
New York, NY
Free Admission

Exhibition Opening
Lydia Cabrera and Édouard Glissant: Trembling Thinking focuses on the ideas developed by the prominent Caribbean thinkers Lydia Cabrera (Havana, 1899–Miami, 1991) and Édouard Glissant (Sainte-Marie, Martinique, 1928–Paris, 2011) and an archipelago of modern and contemporary artists whose works respond to their notions of identity. Artists include: Etel Adnan, Kader Attia, Tania Bruguera, Manthia Diawara, Mestre Didi, Melvin Edwards, Simone Fattal, Sylvie Glissant, Koo Jeong A, Wifredo Lam, Marc Latamie, Roberto Matta, Julie Mehretu, Philippe Parreno, Amelia Peláez, Asad Raza, Anri Sala, Antonio Seguí, Diamond Stingily, Elena Tejada-Herrera, Jack Whitten, and Pedro Zylbersztajn. The exhibition will run from October 9, 2018 to January 12, 2019. 

6:30pm
16 October 2018
Americas Society
680 Park Avenue,

New York, NY
Free Admission. Please register in advance.

Panel Discussion: Lydia Cabrera in the Archipelago
Join Visual Arts at Americas Society for a panel including scholars Katerina Gonzalez Seligmann (assistant professor, Department of Writing, Literature, and Publishing at Emerson College), Martin Tsang (librarian for the Cuban Heritage Collection and curator for Latin American Collections at the University of Miami), and Christopher Winks (Comparative Literature, Faculty member at Queens College), moderated by Gabriela Rangel. They will discuss the Cuban writer-ethnographer Lydia Cabrera (Havana, 1899–Miami, 1991) in relation to the exhibition Lydia Cabrera and Édouard Glissant: Trembling Thinking. The publications by Cabrera including Cuentos Negros de Cuba and El Monteinform current scholarship surrounding literature, ethnography, and art.

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History of Women & Gender: Tracing and Gendering Diaspora

12:30pm – 2:00pm
1 October 2018
King Juan Carlos Center, Room 701
New York University

Please join the History of Women and Gender program for the first event of the semester. This event is cosponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Joan Flores-Villalobos, Assistant Professor of History at The Ohio State University, will discuss her paper ” ‘Freak Letters:’ Tracing and Gendering Diaspora in the Archive of the Panama Canal”.

Abstract:
“This article explores how West Indian women are recorded using the papers and correspondence of the Isthmian Canal Commission, the biggest repository of original documents regarding the construction of the Panama Canal, housed in the National Archives of the United States. Using a 1909 photograph of a nude black West Indian woman found in a file labeled “Freak Letters,” I consider the difficulties of recovering historical subjects structured by imperial frameworks of productivity and perversity, and trace instead the counter-narratives of mobility, affect, and self-determination that might have shaped this woman’s life. I argue that a diasporic and imaginative methodology of recovery can illuminate experiences and limitations beyond the lens of empire. Using this approach, I uncover the archival logic behind “Freak Letters” and recreate the woman’s milieu, highlighting her mobility and diasporic connections. Ultimately, the article seeks to build an empathetic, horizontal, archipelagic counter-discourse as the basis for our explorations of subjects historically silenced or denigrated.”

A light lunch will be served.

RSVP to Clare Richfield at cjr431@nyu.edu for a copy of the text. All are welcome to attend, whether or not you read the paper in advance.

Above text adapted from webpage.

New Puerto Rican Cinema: Emerging Filmmakers

6:00pm – 9:00pm
28 September 2018
King Juan Carlos Center, Auditorium
New York University

NYU’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, present a conversation with the creators of groundbreaking Puerto Rican films, El silencio del viento (The Silence of the Wind; 2017), El Chata (The Sparrow; 2017), and Antes que cante el gallo (Before the Rooster Crows; 201). Introduced by Licia Fiol-Matta (NYU Department of Spanish and Portuguese) and moderated by Jennifer Duprey (Rutgers University Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies), students and the academic community at NYU will have the opportunity to dialogue with the directors, some of the actors, screenwriters, sound designers, and producers of these films.

About the filmmakers and films: Continue reading

A Conversation about Literature and the Arts in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

2:50pm – 4:10pm
27 September 2018
Rutgers University
Center for Cultural Analysis, Room 6051
Academic Building, 15 Seminary Place
New Brunswick, NJ, 08901

The Rutgers Advanced Institute for Critical Caribbean Studies (RAICCS) is pleased to announce the visit of renowned Puerto Rican novelist and visual artist Eduardo Lalo (University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras) to Rutgers U., New Brunswick as part of our “What is Decoloniality?” Speaker Series. Lalo will speak about literature and the arts in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

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Lorna Goodison at the Windham-Campbell Prize Festival

Lorna Goodison, Poet Laureate of Jamaica, is a recipient of a 2018 Windham-Campbell Prize for Poetry. She will be participating in various talks/readings at Yale University during the Prize Festival (12-14 September). Goodison’s participation is detailed below in chronological order. See the Windham-Campbell Prize website for full festival details.

All events below take place on the Yale University campus and are free & open to the public. Continue reading

I Even Regret Night: Verses from Indenture

6:30pm – 8:30pm
29 October 2018
NYU King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center
53 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012

While conducting research for her book Coolie Woman, Gaiutra Bahadur (Visiting Scholar, A/P/A Institute at NYU) came across Lal Bihari Sharma’s Holi Songs of Demerara, the only known literary work written by an indentured laborer in the Anglophone Caribbean. She passed the songbook, written in a combination of Awadhi, Bhojpuri, and Braj Bhasha, to award-winning Indo-Caribbean poet and translator Rajiv Mohabir, and a literary recovery project was born. Join us for a reading from I Even Regret Night: Holi Songs of Demerara (Kaya Press, 2018), which chronicles the “interior lives of indentured men” (Bahadur) on the sugar plantations of British Guiana. Bahadur, who wrote the book’s introduction, and Mohabir, who completed its translation, will be in conversation with Grace Aneiza Ali (NYU Department of Art & Public Policy). Audience members are invited to record their own family histories of indenture and migration with the South Asian American Digital Archive.

Presented by the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU. Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, South Asian American Digital Archive, Rajkumari Cultural Center, Jahajee Sisters, and Guyana Modern.com.

This venue is on the first floor. Restrooms are not all gender, and are accessible via elevator. If you need any accommodations, please email apa.rsvp@nyu.edu at least two weeks before the event date.

Above text adapted from webpage.