Postdoctoral and Faculty Fellowships in Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition

Application Deadline: 1 March 2019

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, part of the MacMillan Center at Yale University, is accepting applications for two types of postdoctoral and faculty fellowships that advance the study of slavery, its role in the creation of the modern world, and its legacies. They are: the Postdoctoral and Faculty Fellowships (one-month and four-month) and the annual Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellowship (academic year).

The Gilder Lehrman Center will award two four-month fellowships, one in the fall semester (from September through December 2019), and one in the spring semester (from either January through April 2020 or February through May 2020). The Gilder Lehrman Center will award several one-month fellowships between September 2019 and May 2020. The GLC will award one full-year Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellowship in 2019-2020. These are in-residence positions. During their time in New Haven, fellows have access to Yale University libraries and resources, office space at the Gilder Lehrman Center, give a public lecture, record a podcast interview, and participate in the intellectual life at the Center.

For the 2019-2020 fellowships, highest priority is given to applications that are fully complete by  March 1, 2019. For further information regarding specific fellowships and the application process see the Gilder Lehrman Center website.

Above text adapted from email.

 

Researcher in Caribbean Studies

Application Deadline: 10 March 2019

The Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (KITLV) / The Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies is a research institute for the interdisciplinary study of Southeast Asia and the Caribbean, with a focus on Indonesia and the ‘Dutch’ Caribbean. We are looking for a talented, hardworking and experienced researcher in Caribbean Studies. You will conduct creative research with regular dissemination of your results through appropriate scholarly outlets and are able to apply for external project funding from national and international funding bodies. We expect you to make a relevant contribution to the public debate on Caribbean parts of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the relations within the Kingdom, and to represent the field to external audiences and in the media.

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VENEZUELA: What’s happening? What’s next?

6:30pm – 9pm
11 February 2019
King Juan Carlos Center, Auditorium 

New York University
RSVP here

For years Venezuela has been mired in a seemingly unending crisis – political impasse, economics chaos, social upheaval. Yet over the past two weeks that crisis appears, at last, to have reached a tipping point. A notoriously fractious opposition has rallied behind a single, youthful leader – Juan Guaidó – who has won the recognition and support of most of the western world. Meanwhile despite growing popular discontent even among former chavista strongholds, Nicolas Maduro remains in power with the support of the military as well as global players like Russia, China, and Turkey. As the stalemate grows and the crisis deepens, what possible futures are in store for Venezuela and it’s people? Is open war on the table? What role should the international community play? And how are Venezuelans themselves responding?

Join us for a conversation about the current situation in Venezuela by a panel of distinguished scholars and experts on the South American country and the region – Beatriz Borges, Dorothy Kronick, Francisco Rodríguez, and Christopher Sabatini. This conversation will be moderated by CLACS faculty members Patricio Navia (Liberal Studies) and Alejandro Velasco (Gallatin, History).

This event is free and open to the public. Co-sponsored by: Urban Democracy Lab, and North American Congress on Latin America (NACLA).

Above text adapted from webpage.

 

Afro-Latinidad in the African Diaspora

6pm – 8pm
12 February 2019
Carter Journalism Institute
20 Cooper Square, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10003
RSVP here

This event is organized by Liberal Arts Professor Kaia Shivers and co-sponsored by the Latinx Project.

With the onset of globalization and the consistent flow of people from Latin America to the United States, Afro-Latinx identity has gained visibility in public discourse. In turn, Black communities revisit the questions of diaspora, race and Latinidad in the Americas. Dr. Will Guzmán, Dr. Jillian Báez, Dr. Adedamola Osinulu and Dr. Donovan Ramon will discuss the intersections and emergence of Afro-Latinidad in the US and Latin America, and the complex meanings of identity and belonging in metropolises like New York City. Continue reading

Assistant Professor in Puerto Rican and Latino Studies

Application Deadline: 15 February 2019

Brooklyn College of the City University of New York (CUNY) invites applications for a full-time tenure- track Assistant Professor position in the Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies (PRLS) with a starting date in August 2019.

Brooklyn College is a microcosm of the ethnically rich borough of Brooklyn it serves as well as a mirror of the wide diversity in New York City itself. A vibrant, intellectually engaged community, our student body comprises individuals from 150 countries, speaking 105 different languages, many of whom are the first in their family to attend college. The College transforms lives by providing access to outstanding undergraduate and graduate programs in the arts and sciences, business, education, and a vibrant general education curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences. The Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies (PRLS) in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Brooklyn College (CUNY) is an academic unit committed to excellence in teaching and scholarship focusing on Latin@/xs, Puerto Ricans, the Caribbean, and Latin America. The Department promotes transformative education encompassing active citizenship and leadership, providing students with the interdisciplinary knowledge and critical skills to live in a rapidly changing and globally interdependent 21st century. Continue reading

Assistant Professor in African American Studies

Application Deadline: Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

City Tech invites applications for a tenure-track position in African American Studies at the Assistant Professor rank, to begin during the 2019-2020 academic year. The African American Studies Department is designed to bring into disciplinary focus, through inter-departmental and multicultural course offerings in Liberal Arts and Sciences, the history and culture of Africans and their descendants, throughout the diaspora from antiquity to the present.

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Recent Publication – Small Axe Volume 22, Issue 3

Small Axe
Volume 22, Issue 3
November 2018

This issue of Small Axe features a discussion section focused on redefining security and insecurity through the centering of the Caribbean. The authors contend with three guiding understandings of security and insecurity: that security and insecurity are deeply located and historically grounded; that security and insecurity are intertwined and constantly produced and reproduced in relation to one another; and the role of creative practice in locating negotiation agency around a specific form and location of security or insecurity.

Small Axe focuses on publishing critical work that examines the ideas that guided the formation of Caribbean modernities. Through the journal many of the conceptions that guided the formation of our Caribbean modernities—conceptions of class, gender, nation, culture, race, for example, as well as conceptions of sovereignty, development, democracy, and so on— receive substantial rethinking. Small Axe aims to enable an informed and sustained debate about the present we inhabit, its political and cultural contours, its historical conditions and global context, and the critical languages in which change can be thought and alternatives reimagined. The journal mainly includes scholarly articles, opinion essays, and interviews, but it also includes literary works of fiction and poetry, visual arts, and reviews.


Cover Art: Miguel Luciano, Pimp My Piragua, 2009.
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*UPDATED* Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora 10th Biennial Conference

Remembrance, Renaissance, Revolution:
The Meaning of Freedom in the African World Over Time and Space

5-9th November 2019
The College of William & Mary Williamsburg, Virginia

*EXTENDED* CFP Deadline: 1 March 2019

The year 2019 marks the four hundredth anniversary of the origins of slavery in what became the United States with the arrival of approximately twenty Africans in modern-day Jamestown, Virginia in August 1619. Described in English records as “twenty and odd” Negroes, these captive Africans from West-Central Africa reflected the growing intensity of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, the world’s largest forced migration that connected Africa, Europe, the Americas, the Caribbean, and Asia. This global system of migration, enslavement, and oppression was critical to the making of the modern world. Throughout the Black world, unfortunately, the emancipation of enslaved people did not result in full freedom. Moreover, decades of European worldwide colonial domination, especially within the African continent, further obstructed people of African descent in the global political economy, with a continued impact in the present day.

Africa is the birthplace of humankind, and under a multiplicity of circumstances, African descendants have dispersed and migrated to every corner of the globe. These numerous African diasporas are marked variously by (in)voluntary movement, servitude, trade, military/imperial objectives, and cultural, academic, and professional ambition. This broader understanding provides new opportunities to fully appreciate the complex histories and creative cultures of today’s many African diasporas. Despite vast differences across and within contemporary African diasporas around the globe, there remain broad commonalities of marginalization, exclusion and relative material deprivation for African-descended people in their respective societies. The contemporary world has seen a resurgence of blatant racism, xenophobia, misogyny, homophobia, and other forms of intolerance directed towards the African-descended and other communities racially constructed as “others”. But despite past and present horrors, African-descended peoples across the globe have survived and thrived, remembering their pasts and re-envisioning their futures in ways that continue to lead to and strive for renaissance, freedom, and revolution in the contemporary world.

ASWAD invites panel and individual paper proposal submissions for its 10th biennial conference to be held in Williamsburg, VA (USA), November 5 to 9, 2019 on the campus of the College of William and Mary to discuss, examine, and reflect on the legacies of enslavement and the meaning(s) of freedom for people of African descent nationally and globally on the four hundredth anniversary of the origins of slavery in what became the United States. We also seek papers that interrogate the many other diasporas that began (and continue) in Africa, and continue to flourish in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, South and Central America, the Caribbean and the Pacific/Indian Ocean basins. We are particularly interested in panels and papers on the conference themes of remembrance, renaissance, and revolution in the many African diasporas across time and space. However, we encourage papers from any time period and topic related to the study of the African-descended.  Continue reading

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Race and Gender History: 2019-2020

Application Deadline: 15 April 2019

The Department of History at Rutgers University announces a post-doctoral
fellowship for scholars pursuing research in race and gender studies. The
successful applicant must have the doctorate in hand at the time of application,
be no more than six years beyond the Ph.D., and be able to teach history courses.
The fellowship of $60,000 is for one year and includes benefits and a $5,000
research stipend. The recipient will teach at least one small course in the history
department and participate in the seminar series at either the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis or the Institute for Research on Women.

Applications should be addressed to Professor Deborah Gray White, Post-Doc
Search Chair, and submitted electronically. Applications should include the
following: letter of interest, C.V., research proposal, writing sample, and at least
three letters of reference. The deadline for applications is April 15, 2019.

Above text adapted from webpage.

Caribbean Music Pedagogy Workshops Summer 2019

LuEsther T. Mertz South Oxford Space
Brooklyn, NY
July 8–19, 2019

Early registration deadline: 15 March 2019
Registration deadline: 15 April 2019

A music pedagogy for social justice…

The Caribbean Music Pedagogy Workshop is back with some exciting changes. The program has been expanded from a 5-day to a 10-day professional development workshop designed to help eradicate systemic racism in the field of music by getting teachers and artists to think consciously about their approaches to teaching and performing music. In keeping with our social justice goals, CMPW instructors are local artists from the Caribbean or of Caribbean ancestry who are experts in their field. They bring a unique perspective to the study of Caribbean music in the U.S. where classes are taught primarily by people outside of the culture. Instructors teach from a Caribbean perspective and offer strategies for teaching musical traditions that have been marginalized within a system that privileges Western art music and Eurocentric pedagogical methods. Summer 2019 will focus on Cuba, Haiti, and Trinidad & Tobago.

Workshop offerings include: Continue reading

Annual Caribbean Writers Series at St. John’s University

with Gina Athena Ulysse

5pm – 7pm
7 February 2019
Little Theater
St. John’s University

About Gina Athena Ulysse:
Ulysse is a feminist artist-anthropologist-activist and self-described Post-Zora Interventionist. She was born in Pétion-Ville, Haïti. Her various creative projects include spokenword, performance art, and installation pieces. Her poetry has appeared in several journals and collections. Her books included Downtown Ladies: Informal Commercial Importers, a Haitian Anthropologist and Self-Making in Jamaica (U of Chicago, 2008), the trilingual–English, French, Haitian Krèyol—Why Haiti Needs New Narratives: A Post-Quake Chronicle (Wesleyan UP, 2015), and Because When God Is Too Busy: Haiti, me & THE WORLD (Wesleyan UP, 2017). She is currently Professor of Anthropology at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut.

Reception to follow the lecture/performance/reading, in the Inclusivity Resource Center (IRC).

Above text and image adapted from email.

13th Caribbean Institute in Gender and Development: An Intensive Training Programme

The University of the West Indies
Cave Hill Campus, Barbados
June 28 – July 26, 2019

Application Deadline: 25 January 2019

The Caribbean Institute in Gender & Development: An Intensive Training Programme is the region’s premier gender and development training programme. The programme is now in its 13th cycle. It is hosted by the Institute for Gender & Development Studies: Nita Barrow Unit of the University of the West Indies.

Who is the Programme for?

The programme is for anyone working or interested in the field of social development. It will benefit persons interested in understanding the issues of gender and development within Caribbean societies, particularly practitioners within government and non-governmental institutions, community-based and service oriented organisations.

The programme focuses on the issues of gender and development within Caribbean Societies from a feminist perspective. It comprises a number of interdisciplinary modules offered at the undergraduate level.

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Recent Publication – sx salon 29: “Windrush”

sx salon
Issue 29
October 2018

In their final issue of 2018, sx salon focused on 2018 as a Windrush year, what it meant for the Windrush generation and on “diverse perceptive on the precarious lives of the Windrush generation” (Introduction). This issue raises, and grapples with, questions of how to be in Caribbean diaspora.

sx salon: a small axe literary platform is a digital forum for innovative critical and creative explorations of Caribbean literature, broadly defined. Caribbean creative writing has always wrestled with the idea of an aesthetic form that engages regional and diasporic understandings of our changing realities. As a forum, sx salon aims to stimulate these sensibilities and preoccupations across different literary genres. Initiated in 2010, sx salon appears three times per year (February, June, and October) and publishes literary discussions, interviews with writers, reviews of new publications (creative and scholarly), and poetry and prose by Caribbean writers.

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Digital Archive – Silencing the Past @ 25

On October 26th and 27th of 2018, the University of Chicago hosted “Silencing the Past @ 25,” a commemorative conference in honor of the work Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History. The year 2020 will mark the 25th anniversary of the publication of Michel-Rolph Trouillot’s seminal text. The purpose of the conference was, “to reflect both on the continued importance and afterlife of Silencing the Past (STP) and on its relationship to Trouillot’s larger oeuvre” (About). Video recordings of some of the conference panels are currently available online and can be found here. Proceedings from the conference will be published as a volume in 2020.

Above text and image adapted from webpage.