css.php

Upcoming Event: Digital Puerto Rican Studies: Social Scholarship, Mapping, & Archives

Please join the Puerto Rico Syllabus this Friday, October 23rd for “Digital Puerto Rican Studies: Social Scholarship, Mapping, and Archives,” a virtual event and discussion sponsored by LASA-Puerto Rico. Register below:

This event represents the launch of the new website for The Puerto Rico Syllabus, a digital resource for critical thinking and teaching about the Puerto Rican Debt Crisis. In addition to discussing the new “decolonial design” and future plans, The #PRSyllabus will also be in conversation with the leaders of three other digital projects that contribute to Puerto Rican Studies and provide resources for broad publics.

Digital Puerto Rican Studies: Social Scholarship, Mapping, and Archives this Fri, Oct 23rd, 6:00 PM (EDT) | This event will take place on Zoom. Register here to access the link to Zoom.

This event spotlights four digital projects that contribute to Puerto Rican Studies and provide resources for broad publics: The Puerto Rico SyllabusProyecto historias orales cayeyanas: Vivencias y resistencias, Visualizando El Apoyo Mutuo: Solidaridad en acción, and the Digital Library of the Caribbean-Archivo Histórico de Vieques.

The event will include moderated discussion about each project, followed by a Q&A with the audience.

This event is sponsored by LASA Puerto Rico, with media co-sponsorship by the Puerto Rico Syllabus project led by Dr. Yarimar Bonilla as part of the Mellon Seminar on Public Engagement and Collaborative Research from the Center for the Humanities at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Add to the conversation by using #DigitalPRStudies

Continue reading Upcoming Event: Digital Puerto Rican Studies: Social Scholarship, Mapping, & Archives

Liminal Spaces: Migration and Women of the Guyanese Diaspora

New book announcement: Liminal Spaces: Migration and Women of the Guyanese Diaspora, edited by Grace Aneiza Ali. Please find the description, the table of contents, and the chapter descriptions below. The book can be accessed (free in PDF form at the time of this posting) here.

Liminal Spaces: Migration and Women of the Guyanese Diaspora

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Liminal Spaces is an intimate exploration into the migration narratives of fifteen women of Guyanese heritage. It spans diverse inter-generational perspectives – from those who leave Guyana, and those who are left – and seven seminal decades of Guyana’s history – from the 1950s to the present day – bringing the voices of women to the fore. The volume is conceived of as a visual exhibition on the page; a four-part journey navigating the contributors’ essays and artworks, allowing the reader to trace the migration path of Guyanese women from their moment of departure, to their arrival on diasporic soils, to their reunion with Guyana.

Eloquent and visually stunning, Liminal Spaces unpacks the global realities of migration, challenging and disrupting dominant narratives associated with Guyana, its colonial past, and its post-colonial present as a ‘disappearing nation’. Multimodal in approach, the volume combines memoir, creative non-fiction, poetry, photography, art and curatorial essays to collectively examine the mutable notion of ‘homeland’, and grapple with ideas of place and accountability.

This volume is a welcome contribution to the scholarly field of international migration, transnationalism, and diaspora, both in its creative methodological approach, and in its subject area – as one of the only studies published on Guyanese diaspora. It will be of great interest to those studying women and migration, and scholars and students of diaspora studies.

Continue reading Liminal Spaces: Migration and Women of the Guyanese Diaspora

Caribbean Studies Journals – Summer 2020 Publications

The following Caribbean Studies journals published new issues this summer:

Caribbean Quarterly – Volume 66, Issue 2, June 2020
Small Axe – Volume 24, Number 2, July 2020
PREE Caribbean Writing – Issue 5, June 2020
SX Salon – Issue 34, June 2020

Below you will find details of each new issue:

Continue reading Caribbean Studies Journals – Summer 2020 Publications

NGC Bocas Virtual Lit Fest

No registration, tickets, or social media required!

The event will stream on the following days and times (Atlantic GMT-4):

Friday 18 September 4:30pm – 8:45pm

Saturday 19 September 12 noon – 9:00pm

Sunday 20 September 10:30 – 8:30pm

2020 is a milestone year for the NGC Bocas Lit Fest: the tenth year of Trinidad and Tobago’s national literature festival, which has grown into the Anglophone Caribbean’s biggest annual literary celebration.

The 2020 NGC Bocas Lit Fest, running from 18 to 20 September, will go down in history for another reason: it’s the first-ever entirely virtual and online version of the festival, with 80 participating writers and speakers and a programme of free events livestreamed via the Bocas Lit Fest website and on social media.

Many of the 2020 festival events focus on recently published books, some of which will be launched by their authors in this virtual format. Book-lovers can look out for appearances by T&T authors such as Ingrid Persaud, Caroline Mackenzie, Elizabeth Walcott-Hackshaw, Monique Roffey, and Andre Bagoo, alongside writers from the broader Caribbean, including Jacob Ross, Canisia Lubrin, John Robert Lee, and 2020 OCM Bocas Prize winner Richard Georges.

The opening day of the festival, 18 September, has been dubbed Future Friday, presenting a showcase of emerging and established Caribbean speculative fiction writers, exploring the question of what the disruptive events of 2020 mean for the Caribbean in the coming decades and centuries. Organised in partnership with the newly established Caribbean Futures Institute — an international project bringing together writers and scientists — Future Friday will be headlined by a discussion event with star writers Karen Lord, Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, and Malka Older.

Continue reading NGC Bocas Virtual Lit Fest

National Caribbean American Heritage Month Webinar Series

U.S. Embassy Guyana in  collaboration with Caribbean Studies Association celebrated National Caribbean American Heritage Month with a webinar series under the theme: “Caribbean-American Connections, Social Justice and Shared Dreams”.

  • June 16: Caribbean – American cultural connections: cultural forms, cultural industries and social justice.
  • June 23: Caribbean contributions to race, gender, sexuality and social justice in the USA and the Caribbean.
  • June 30: The Caribbean diaspora’s role in building just Caribbean and American futures.

Above adapted from: CSA Newsletter – August 2020

CFP – Francosphères Journal – The “Trembling” of Édouard Glissant

Open Call for Papers: Édouard Glissant – Special issue of Francosphères Journal (December 2021).

Deadline for ABSTRACTS: 1 October 2020

Deadline for ARTICLES (MHRA Style): 1 February 2021

Submit to: jegoussoj@hollins.edu

Publication: December 2021 in Francosphères

“Le monde a toujours été un perpétuel devenir [The world has always been in perpetual becoming]” says Édouard Glissant in 1994 in an interview published in the journal Passages (12). Here, he announced the grounds of the “unpredictable”, “disconcerting”, “complex”, and “intricate” nature of what constituted for him “l’objet le plus haut du poème [the highest purpose of the poem]” (La Terre le Feu l’Eau et les Vents. Une anthologie de la poésie du Tout-monde, 19). However, if the world was a double object of poetry and thought for Glissant, it was also subject to variations in different and successive forms during the course of its literary production (poetry, essay, novel, theater play …). Although imagined and thought of as a “totality”, the world could just as well be “unique” as Glissant writes in his first essay, Sun of Consciousness (1956), asserting then “que tout être vient à la conscience du monde par son monde d’abord ; d’autant universel (pour parler large) qu’il est particulier ; d’autant généreux et commun qu’il a su devenir seul, et inversement ? [that every being comes to the consciousness of the world through his world first; as universal (broadly speaking) as it is unique; as generous and common as it became solitary, and vice versa?]” (18).

Continue reading CFP – Francosphères Journal – The “Trembling” of Édouard Glissant

Writing Home: American Voices from the Caribbean – Podcast

Conversations/PodcastWriting Home: American Voices from the Caribbean

Current Episodes feature: Naomi Jackson, Alexis Gumbs, & Staceyann Chin.

About the Podcast:

“An outgrowth of the popular “live” Critical Caribbean Feminisms events, which since 2015 have been bringing together established and emerging writers from the Caribbean and its diasporas, WRITING HOME is an ode to the Americas very literally writ large. Each episode features an exceptional contemporary cultural actor in conversation with hosts Kaiama L. Glover and Tami Navarro and aims to trace the geographies of resistance that ground our feminist practices of diaspora. The beauty, humor, and hope that animate these encounters are a welcome antidote to the heartbreak of the present moment.”

Above adapted from: Writing Home website

The Black Fantastic – Third Stone Journal CFP

CFPThird Stone Journal – Open call for scholarly articles of varying lengths and creative work
Deadline: Rolling
Submit: 3rdstonejournal@gmail.com

Across the African diaspora, art has been a form of expression and liberation at times of widespread cultural oppression, enabling artists of color to resist the tradition of silencing while preserving their histories, traditions, and more in ways that could be passed down intergenerationally. While much art worked to fulfill a political purpose by pushing for equality and liberty in oppressive cultures, other works aimed at achieving liberation by celebrating Black cultural forms, from the cutting-edge music of Erykah Badu to that of Janelle Monae. Eager to explore art as liberation among other topics, Third Stone accepts submissions year round of art, music, creative writing, short films, scholarship, digital content, and more on Afrofuturism, African-futurism, and the Black fantastic as explored both inside and outside of the borders of the United States.

Continue reading The Black Fantastic – Third Stone Journal CFP

CFP – Concept and Approaches to Whiteness in Latin America and the Caribbean – Special Journal Issue

CFP Deadline: 2 March 2020

“…In this proposed special journal issue, we approach race as a relational concept that not only involves oppressed ‘racial minorities,’ but also white populations who benefit from racial disparities in politically, socially, quotidian, and systemic ways. Seeking to provide a roadmap to examine racial privilege in Latin America and the Caribbean, in this Call for Papers, we encourage abstract submissions from humanists and social scientists whose work carefully examines whiteness in the region, while highlighting critical theoretical debates and empirical approaches…”

To view the full CFP and to submit, please refer to the website.

Above text adapted from email and website.

Boyhood and Masculinity in Contemporary Guyanese Film

Date: Monday, 3 February 2020
Time: 6:00PM – 9:00PM
Location: King Juan Carlos I Center, 53 Washington Sq S, New York, NY 10012

This event is free and open to the public, ID required at the entrance. RSVP here.

Event Description: The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) present two film screenings — of ANTIMAN and The Seawall — and a conversation with directors Gavin Ramoutar and Mason Richards, Dr. Sheril Antonio film scholar and Associate Arts Professor in the Department of Art & Public Policy and Grace Aneiza Ali, Curator and Assistant Professor in the Department of Art & Public Policy, on the issues of boyhood and masculinity and migration within the Guyanese and Caribbean diaspora.

About the Films:

In Gavin Ramoutar’s short film ANTIMAN, Anil, an introverted young teen navigates the pressures by his father to become a cricket player to prove his masculinity. Privately, he must reconcile his love for an older boy while living in a homophobic village in a Guyanese countryside.

In Mason Richards’ short film The Seawall, ten-year-old Malachi prepares to leave Guyana and his beloved grandmother for the United States. As he wrestles with the impending rupture from his motherland, the film poignantly examines how migration — from a young boy’s perspective — fragments a family. Continue reading Boyhood and Masculinity in Contemporary Guyanese Film

Call for Papers – Global Caribbean Studies: “Scapes”

CFP Deadline: 15 January 2020

The 2018 theme for the 37th Annual West Indian Literature Conference recognized the vast routes/roots that link the Caribbean to the hemisphere and the globe.  As many writers and literary scholars have noted, the immense bodies of water that appear to isolate belie the currents that intimately connect, and at times, destroy shelter, lands, and peoples. Deploying Arjun Appadurai’s concept of “scapes” that work to enable the exchange of ideas and information, we engaged a breadth of issues relevant to Caribbeanists in the region and its diasporas.   We are now soliciting papers from that conference for publication in an upcoming issue of Anthurium: A Caribbean Studies Journal.

Please upload your submission at anthurium.miami.edu/about/submissions/.

Above text adapted from email.

Call for Book Chapter Proposals — Becoming Home: Diaspora and the Anglophone Transnational

Deadline: 1 March 2020

“…This collection of essays on the literature or national allegories (Jameson) of the diaspora and the transnational plans to explore the sundry and geographically expansive ways Anglophone literatures by colonized subjects and emigrants negotiate diasporic spaces to create what Benedict Anderson sees as “imagined communities,” or what Homi Bhabha calls “home, a place uncannily oscillating between estrangement and engagement…. Papers will explore the lived experiences of emigrants of the diaspora within this specific linguistic and cultural area, and the extent to which these new and evolving spaces (physical, ontological, and metaphorical) represented in literature are rife with tensions concerning identify, language, and belongingness in the struggle for home…”

Themes could include but are not limited to:

  • restlessness and tensions
  • ambiguities
  • assimilation
  • resistance to total immersion
  • nostalgia, sentimentality, and homesickness
  • national schizophrenia
  • divided loyalties
  • intellectual capital
  • and geographical interstices—living uncomfortably in that space between two worlds, one perhaps dead and the other struggling to be born.

Please refer to the post for more information.

Contact:

Jude V. Nixon (Jnixon@salemstate.edu) and Mariaconcetta Costantini (mariaconcetta.costantini@unich.it), editors to the volume, or Victoria Echegaray (victoria.echegaray@vernonpress.com), Vernon Press editor.

Above text adapted from email and webpage.

Assistant or Associate Professor in African American and Africana Studies and Environmental Justice

Application Deadline: Review of applications begins December 1, 2019.

The University of Kentucky in Lexington is in the second year of a multi-year hiring plan to build a more inclusive curriculum, diversify our faculty, support our Program in African American and Africana Studies, and to contribute to our new undergraduate major in that program. Faculty will have tenure homes in departments relevant to their training and research focus and will actively help build and support the AAAS program. Last year we hired seven new faculty and this year we plan to hire additional faculty in diaspora studies, black feminisms, environmental justice, ethnomusicology, and the economics of inequality. This ad is explicitly a call for applications for a position in Environmental Justice.

The program in African American and Africana Studies (AAAS) invites applications for an Assistant or Associate Professor with a specialization in social science approaches to Environmental Justice to begin August 2020. The successful applicant’s tenure home is open, and will be discipline-specific to include the departments of Anthropology, Geography, Sociology, or other departments in the College of Arts and Sciences (https://www.as.uky.edu/).

They seek candidates who center Black perspectives and experiences in areas such as environmental racism, (feminist) political ecology, racialized landscapes, cultural memory, community response to disaster and disaster recovery, critical development studies, conservation, climate justice, land rights and territorial politics, political activism, and/or social justice. Applicants who include community engagement, participatory research or other qualitative approaches in their research programs are especially welcome. Area of geographic specialization is open.

Applicants should have PhD in hand by July 2020.

Application Instructions:

Applicants should submit the following:

  1. a letter of application
  2. a current CV
  3. one writing sample
  4. a teaching portfolio, which should include a teaching statement, sample course syllabi, and sample teaching/course evaluations (upload under Specific Request 1)
  5. a diversity statement (upload under Specific Request 2)

Also provide the names and contact information for three references when prompted in the academic profile. This information may be utilized to solicit recommendation letters from your references within the employment system.

Questions about the search should be addressed to the search committee chair, Professor Lisa Cliggett, lisa.cliggett@uky.edu.

Above text adapted from webpage.

 

 

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Scholars-in-Residence Fellowships

Application Deadline: December 1, 2019

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a unit of The New York Public Library, invites applications for its Scholars-in-Residence Program for the 2020-2021 academic year.

The program offers long-term and short-term research fellowships to scholars and writers pursuing projects in African diasporic studies in fields including history, politics, literature, and culture.

Long-term fellowships provide a $35,000 stipend to support academics and independent scholars who work in residence at the Schomburg Center for a continuous period of six to nine months. Fellows are provided with individual office space, research assistance, and access to the unparalleled resources of the Schomburg Center. In addition to pursuing their own research projects, fellows also engage in an ongoing interdisciplinary exchange of ideas, sharing their research with one another in a weekly work-in-progress seminar. While in residence, they are also exposed to the vibrant intellectual life of the Schomburg through its public exhibitions, panels, screenings, and events.

Short-term fellowships are open to postdoctoral scholars, independent researchers, and creative writers (novelists, playwrights, poets) who work in residence at the Center for a continuous period of one to three months. Short-term fellows receive a stipend of $3000 per month.

Requirements: The program is intended for scholars requiring extensive, on-site research with collections at the Schomburg, the pre-eminent repository for documentation on the history and cultures of peoples of African descent around the globe. Fellows are expected to be in full-time residence at the Center during the award period and to participate in scheduled seminars and colloquia. Persons seeking support for research leading to degrees are not eligible under this program. Current candidates for advanced degrees must be scheduled to complete and receive their degree before the start date of the fellowship.

This program is made possible in part through grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Ford Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation.

Application Instructions:

A complete application must include:

  • The Schomburg Center Scholars-in-Residence Application.
  • A 1500-word description of the proposed study.
  • Curriculum vitae (limit to 3 pages).
  • Names of references (long-term fellows must submit three recommendation letters; short-term fellows must submit a minimum of two letters). References will receive an e-mail instructing them how to upload their recommendations.

For more information and to apply , please visit: schomburgcenter.org/scholarsinresidence

Above text adapted from webpage.

Assistant Professor in African and African Diasporic History

Application Deadline: Screening of applications begins December 5, 2019. Review of applications may continue until the position is filled.

The Department of History at The University of Memphis invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor, with a specialization in African and African diasporic history, starting in Fall 2020. The department seeks to further strengthen its core program in African American history with the addition of a faculty member focusing on Africa and the African diaspora, with a preference for specialists in the precolonial era.

The successful applicant will be expected to teach upper-division and graduate courses in African and African diasporic history as well as a survey course in World, African American, or U.S. History. Normal teaching load is 2/2. The Department of History is committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty, and we therefore welcome applicants who are from groups that are historically underrepresented.

PhD required by the time of appointment.

The Search Committee will conduct preliminary interviews by video conference the second week of January 2020.

Application Instructions:

Applications must include:

  • Letter of application (“Cover Letter”)
  • CV
  • Writing excerpt from book/dissertation/article (“Other Document 1”)
  • Academic transcript (“Other Document 2”)
  • Contact information (including email address) for three professional references (“References List”)

Above text adapted from website.