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Author Archives: Kelly Baker Josephs

Boyhood and Masculinity in Contemporary Guyanese Film

Date: Monday, 3 February 2020
Time: 6:00PM – 9:00PM
Location: King Juan Carlos I Center, 53 Washington Sq S, New York, NY 10012

This event is free and open to the public, ID required at the entrance. RSVP here.

Event Description: The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) present two film screenings — of ANTIMAN and The Seawall — and a conversation with directors Gavin Ramoutar and Mason Richards, Dr. Sheril Antonio film scholar and Associate Arts Professor in the Department of Art & Public Policy and Grace Aneiza Ali, Curator and Assistant Professor in the Department of Art & Public Policy, on the issues of boyhood and masculinity and migration within the Guyanese and Caribbean diaspora.

About the Films:

In Gavin Ramoutar’s short film ANTIMAN, Anil, an introverted young teen navigates the pressures by his father to become a cricket player to prove his masculinity. Privately, he must reconcile his love for an older boy while living in a homophobic village in a Guyanese countryside.

In Mason Richards’ short film The Seawall, ten-year-old Malachi prepares to leave Guyana and his beloved grandmother for the United States. As he wrestles with the impending rupture from his motherland, the film poignantly examines how migration — from a young boy’s perspective — fragments a family. Continue reading

Caribbean Film Series: A 5th Anniversary Festival

14 – 17 March 2019
BAM Rose Cinemas
30 Lafayette Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11217

Description from the Caribbean Film Academy website: Caribbean cinema is at a high point critically and artistically, in the ways its filmmakers thrill, entertain, and inform audiences globally. This four-day festival marks the five-year anniversary of the Caribbean Film Series, providing an unparalleled platform to reflect on the Caribbean and its diasporic experiences, in new and unconventional ways.

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Schedule of film screenings: Continue reading

Lorna Goodison at the Windham-Campbell Prize Festival

Lorna Goodison, Poet Laureate of Jamaica, is a recipient of a 2018 Windham-Campbell Prize for Poetry. She will be participating in various talks/readings at Yale University during the Prize Festival (12-14 September). Goodison’s participation is detailed below in chronological order. See the Windham-Campbell Prize website for full festival details.

All events below take place on the Yale University campus and are free & open to the public. Continue reading

Special issue: Intersections of Postcolonial studies and Indigenous studies

CFP: Special issue of Ariel: a Review of International English Literatureslated for publication in 2020
Due dates: 250-word abstracts due August 1, 2018; final articles due January 15, 2019.

Call for Papers

This special 50th anniversary issue of Ariel: a Review of International English Literature,  will unpack the tensions and interrelationships between postcolonial studies and Indigenous studies. When Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin published The Empire Writes Back (1989), the ensuing recognition of Canada and the United States as products of imperialism and colonization necessarily provoked questions about the people who preceded settlers. Indigenous literary studies became recognized as a necessary missing piece of those conversations. However, the vocabulary and approaches of postcolonial theory often failed to address–or even obstructed–questions that Indigenous literary scholars, particularly those with community obligations, needed to consider. Ariel’s 50th Anniversary Issue is an opportunity to reconsider the trajectory of discussions among Indigenous and postcolonial studies scholars and practitioners. At this historical juncture of increased visibility of issues concerning Indigenous rights, migration, displacement, and global imperialism among other pressing urgencies, now is the moment to return to these debates and recast the dialogue.

Continue reading

VISIONARY APONTE: ART & BLACK FREEDOM (A SYMPOSIUM)

This symposium will gather scholars and artists discussing the figure of José Antonio Aponte and the art exhibit on view at the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center from 23 February to 4 May, Visionary Aponte: Art and Black Freedom.

Symposium:
Friday, 23 February
9:00am5:00pm
King Juan Carlos I Center
New York University
53 Washington Sq S
New York, NY