Category Archives: Announcements

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Assistant or Associate Professor in African American and Africana Studies and Environmental Justice

Application Deadline: Review of applications begins December 1, 2019.

The University of Kentucky in Lexington is in the second year of a multi-year hiring plan to build a more inclusive curriculum, diversify our faculty, support our Program in African American and Africana Studies, and to contribute to our new undergraduate major in that program. Faculty will have tenure homes in departments relevant to their training and research focus and will actively help build and support the AAAS program. Last year we hired seven new faculty and this year we plan to hire additional faculty in diaspora studies, black feminisms, environmental justice, ethnomusicology, and the economics of inequality. This ad is explicitly a call for applications for a position in Environmental Justice.

The program in African American and Africana Studies (AAAS) invites applications for an Assistant or Associate Professor with a specialization in social science approaches to Environmental Justice to begin August 2020. The successful applicant’s tenure home is open, and will be discipline-specific to include the departments of Anthropology, Geography, Sociology, or other departments in the College of Arts and Sciences (https://www.as.uky.edu/).

They seek candidates who center Black perspectives and experiences in areas such as environmental racism, (feminist) political ecology, racialized landscapes, cultural memory, community response to disaster and disaster recovery, critical development studies, conservation, climate justice, land rights and territorial politics, political activism, and/or social justice. Applicants who include community engagement, participatory research or other qualitative approaches in their research programs are especially welcome. Area of geographic specialization is open.

Applicants should have PhD in hand by July 2020.

Application Instructions:

Applicants should submit the following:

  1. a letter of application
  2. a current CV
  3. one writing sample
  4. a teaching portfolio, which should include a teaching statement, sample course syllabi, and sample teaching/course evaluations (upload under Specific Request 1)
  5. a diversity statement (upload under Specific Request 2)

Also provide the names and contact information for three references when prompted in the academic profile. This information may be utilized to solicit recommendation letters from your references within the employment system.

Questions about the search should be addressed to the search committee chair, Professor Lisa Cliggett, lisa.cliggett@uky.edu.

Above text adapted from webpage.

 

 

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Scholars-in-Residence Fellowships

Application Deadline: December 1, 2019

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a unit of The New York Public Library, invites applications for its Scholars-in-Residence Program for the 2020-2021 academic year.

The program offers long-term and short-term research fellowships to scholars and writers pursuing projects in African diasporic studies in fields including history, politics, literature, and culture.

Long-term fellowships provide a $35,000 stipend to support academics and independent scholars who work in residence at the Schomburg Center for a continuous period of six to nine months. Fellows are provided with individual office space, research assistance, and access to the unparalleled resources of the Schomburg Center. In addition to pursuing their own research projects, fellows also engage in an ongoing interdisciplinary exchange of ideas, sharing their research with one another in a weekly work-in-progress seminar. While in residence, they are also exposed to the vibrant intellectual life of the Schomburg through its public exhibitions, panels, screenings, and events.

Short-term fellowships are open to postdoctoral scholars, independent researchers, and creative writers (novelists, playwrights, poets) who work in residence at the Center for a continuous period of one to three months. Short-term fellows receive a stipend of $3000 per month.

Requirements: The program is intended for scholars requiring extensive, on-site research with collections at the Schomburg, the pre-eminent repository for documentation on the history and cultures of peoples of African descent around the globe. Fellows are expected to be in full-time residence at the Center during the award period and to participate in scheduled seminars and colloquia. Persons seeking support for research leading to degrees are not eligible under this program. Current candidates for advanced degrees must be scheduled to complete and receive their degree before the start date of the fellowship.

This program is made possible in part through grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Ford Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation.

Application Instructions:

A complete application must include:

  • The Schomburg Center Scholars-in-Residence Application.
  • A 1500-word description of the proposed study.
  • Curriculum vitae (limit to 3 pages).
  • Names of references (long-term fellows must submit three recommendation letters; short-term fellows must submit a minimum of two letters). References will receive an e-mail instructing them how to upload their recommendations.

For more information and to apply , please visit: schomburgcenter.org/scholarsinresidence

Above text adapted from webpage.

Assistant Professor in African and African Diasporic History

Application Deadline: Screening of applications begins December 5, 2019. Review of applications may continue until the position is filled.

The Department of History at The University of Memphis invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor, with a specialization in African and African diasporic history, starting in Fall 2020. The department seeks to further strengthen its core program in African American history with the addition of a faculty member focusing on Africa and the African diaspora, with a preference for specialists in the precolonial era.

The successful applicant will be expected to teach upper-division and graduate courses in African and African diasporic history as well as a survey course in World, African American, or U.S. History. Normal teaching load is 2/2. The Department of History is committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty, and we therefore welcome applicants who are from groups that are historically underrepresented.

PhD required by the time of appointment.

The Search Committee will conduct preliminary interviews by video conference the second week of January 2020.

Application Instructions:

Applications must include:

  • Letter of application (“Cover Letter”)
  • CV
  • Writing excerpt from book/dissertation/article (“Other Document 1”)
  • Academic transcript (“Other Document 2”)
  • Contact information (including email address) for three professional references (“References List”)

Above text adapted from website.

Assistant Professor in Gender and Women’s Studies and African American and Africana Studies

Application Deadline: Review of applications will begin November 20, 2019 and position will remain open until filled.

The University of Kentucky in Lexington is in the second year of a multi-year hiring plan to build a more inclusive curriculum, diversify our faculty, support our Program in African American and Africana Studies, and to contribute to our new undergraduate major in that program. Faculty will have tenure homes is departments relevant to their training and research focus and are expected to actively help build and support the AAAS program. Last year we hired seven new faculty (https://aaas.as.uky.edu/uks-new-faculty-hires-taking-african-american-africana-studies-next-level-0). This year we plan to hire additional faculty, in diaspora studies, black feminisms, environmental justice, ethnomusicology, and the economics of inequality. This ad is explicitly a call for applications for a position in Women of Color Feminism/Critical Race Theory, with an emphasis on Black Feminisms.

The Program in African American and Africana Studies (AAAS) and the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky seek applications for a full-time, tenure-track, assistant professor who will actively contribute to the undergraduate and graduate programs and the research profiles of both units. We seek to hire a scholar in the area of Women of Color Feminism/Critical Race Theory, with an emphasis on Black Feminisms. Possible sub-specialties might include—but are not limited to—areas such as diasporas, environmental justice, migration studies, indigenous feminisms, transnational feminist studies, hip hop feminism, and decolonial methodologies within black studies.

Candidates are expected to have a PhD in hand by August 15, 2020.

Application Instructions:

Applicants should submit the following:

1) a cover letter including a statement of research and teaching interests that shows strong engagement with both GWS and AAAS
2) curriculum vitae
3) one publication or professional paper (upload as Specific Request 1)
4) diversity statement: in 1-2 pages, applicants should reflect on their commitments, approaches, and insights related to inclusion, diversity, and equity (upload as Specific Request 2).

Also provide the names and contact information for three references when prompted in the academic profile. This information may be utilized to solicit recommendation letters from your references within the employment system.

Above text adapted from website.

 

2020-2021 AADS Dissertation Fellowship – Boston College: Morrissey College of Arts & Sciences: African and African Diaspora Studies

Application Deadline: 8 January 2020 (11:59PM EST)

Boston College’s African & African Diaspora Studies Program (AADS) announces its dissertation fellowship competition.  Scholars working in any discipline in the Social Sciences or Humanities, with projects focusing on any topic within African and/or African Diaspora Studies, are eligible to apply.  We seek applicants pursuing innovative, preferably interdisciplinary, projects in dialogue with critical issues and trends within the field.

This 2020/2021 fellowship includes a $30,000 stipend; access to highly subsidized health insurance through Boston College; a $1,500 research budget; a $3,000 moving expense allotment, and a fully equipped, shared office.  The fellow must remain in residence for the 9-month academic year, deliver one public lecture, and teach one seminar course.

The fellow will also be compensated for teaching the course with a taxable service stipend. The fellow will have full access to BC’s seven libraries as well as several rare book and manuscript collections.  Of particular interest is the Nicholas M. Williams Caribbeana Collection, consisting of materials from and about Africa, Jamaica, and the British West Indies.  The fellow can also benefit from the Apprenticeship in College Teaching and Dissertation Bootcamp programs—both of which are completely voluntary—as well as events and installations sponsored by programs in International Studies, American Studies, Asian American Studies, Islamic Civilization and Societies, and the internationally renowned McMullen Museum.

Qualifications

Eligible applicants must be currently enrolled in a PhD Program and be ABD by the start of the fellowship year. US Citizens, Permanent Residents and International Students are encouraged to apply.

Application Instructions:

Submit all application materials – including letters of recommendation – by Wednesday, 8 January 2020 at 11:59 pm Eastern Standard Time (EST) via Interfolio.

Applications must include:
1) a 3000 word project proposal that includes a plan for completion and description of how this fellowship will assist applicant in achieving future professional goals
2) a 25 page MAXIMUM writing sample
3) a CV
4) three letters of recommendation, one of which must be from the dissertation advisor

Above text adapted from webpage.

Ebony G. Patterson | …to dig between the cuts, beneath the leaves, below the soil… | Hales New York

Opening Reception:
6pm – 8pm
24 October 2019
Exhibition:
October 24 – December 20, 2019
Hale’s New York

547 West 20th Street

Gallery installation shot

Hales is delighted to announce …to dig between the cuts, beneath the leaves, below the soil…, an exhibition of recent works by Ebony G. Patterson (b. 1981 Kingston, Jamaica). In her first solo exhibition with the gallery, Patterson continues with her exploration of gardens, an essential arc of her practice. This exhibition comprises of a new series of monumental paper collages which take their departure from Patterson’s celebrated touring solo exhibition, …while the dew is still on the roses…, which first opened at Pérez Museum of Art Miami (November 2018), and is currently on view at Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY (through January 5, 2020).

Patterson began working on the collages in this exhibition in her studio in Jamaica, before completing them on a residency at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, AR, in 2019. In Patterson’s work, she explores the idea of the garden as both real and imagined, in relation to the procurement and legacies of postcolonial space:

“I am interested in how gardens – natural but cultivated settings – operate with social demarcations. I investigate their relationship to beauty, dress, class, race, the body, land and death.”
(Ebony G. Patterson, 2018)

In …to dig between the cuts, beneath the leaves, below the soil… Patterson continues to deftly combine splendor with danger. Framing the garden as an active site of power, Patterson explores it as a metaphor for postcolonial space and an extension of the body. Juxtaposing visibility and invisibility; death and survival, Patterson’s works remain filled with an overwhelming sense of hope – in the toughest of circumstances, life will always grow.

Above text and image adapted from email and website.

Melancholia Africana: The Indispensable Overcoming of the Black Condition

7pm – 9pm
30 October 2019
The People’s Forum

320 West 37th Street

This year marks the publication of the English translation of Nathalie Etoke’s Melancholia Africana: The Indispensable Overcoming of the Black Condition. In richly poetic prose Etoke considers pain singing the happiness to come, memories of forgetting, and on va faire comment? She argues that Africana melancholy is distinct. Rooted in collective and historical experiences of enslavement, colonization, and neocolonialism marked by loss of land, freedom, language, culture, and self. Put differently, expropriation of labor and of land also annihilated age-old cycles of life. Considering what to do in the wake of such annihilation, Etoke explores how diasporic Africans reconcile that which has been destroyed with what is newly introduced, framing this inherent tension as the character of Africana historical becoming. On October 30th, Etoke will read from and speak about her newly translated work while Lewis R. Gordon, who authored its new foreword, and Souleymane Bachir Diagne will address the continued relevance of its searching diagnoses.

Suggested donation: $6/$10/$15, no one turned away for inability to pay.

Above text and image adapted from email.

Assistant Professor, Latina/Latino Studies (Tenure-Track)

Application Deadline: October 21, 2019

San Francisco State University’s, Department of Latina/Latino Studies offers an exciting opportunity for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position focused on Afro-Latinidad from a social science or humanities perspective beginning August 2020.

We seek a colleague whose teaching and research interests include a transnational understanding of the intersections of Afro-Latinidad in the United States, the Spanish Caribbean, and Latin America.

About the Department:

The Department of Latina/Latino Studies is a unique liberal arts BA degree program with an emphasis on equity, social justice, and community empowerment focused on developing critical thinking, analytical writing skills, and an area of expertise centered on Latinas/os/x in the U.S. The Latina/Latino Studies Department favors a pan-Latino approach to the study of Chicana/o/x, Mexican, Central American, South American, and Caribbean-American communities in the U.S. We emphasize gender, transnational identities, global economies, social movements, and critical, socially responsible scholarship that links our classrooms to local communities and their empowerment through both our curriculum and our community service learning program.

About the University:

The mission of San Francisco State University is to create and maintain an environment for learning that promotes respect for and appreciation of scholarship, freedom, human diversity, and the cultural mosaic of the City of San Francisco and the Bay Area; to promote excellence in instruction and intellectual accomplishment; and to provide broadly accessible higher education for residents of the region and state, as well as the nation and world. To fulfill its mission, the University is committed to the following goals:

•Attracting, retaining and graduating a highly diverse student body
•Providing disciplinary and interdisciplinary liberal arts and professional education that is academically rigorous and intellectually challenging
•Providing curricula that reflect all dimensions of human diversity, and that encourage critical thinking and a commitment to social justice
•Recruiting, retaining and supporting a diverse faculty whose teaching demonstrates an active engagement with their individual fields of study and whose creative and scholarly work is an extension of the classroom, laboratory or studio
•Employing a staff and administration reflecting the diversity of our student community and the values of the campus;
•Fostering a collegial and cooperative intellectual environment that includes recognition and appreciation of differing viewpoints and promotes academic freedom within the University community; and
•Serving the communities with which its students and faculty are engaged.

Responsibilities:

The position requires undergraduate teaching of courses on the Afro-Latino diaspora, mentoring and advising of graduate and undergraduate students, developing an active ongoing scholarship program in one’s area of specialty, and ongoing committee and service assignments.

Teaching assignments will include the following courses:
LTNS 215: Introduction to Latina/Latino Studies
LTNS 380: Afro-Latina/o Diasporas
LTNS 440: Caribbean Cultures and Spirituality
LTNS 467: Caribbeans in the U.S.: History and Heritage.

Teaching assignments may also include the following and other existing courses:
LTNS 470: Latina/o Immigration to the U.S.
LTNS 278: History of Latinos in the U.S.
The Department supports the creation of additional courses that focus on the broader Afro-Latino diaspora.

The candidate’s research agenda should address how ideas of Blackness and Latinidad have intersected historically and would connect this to contemporary experiences between and among African Americans, Afro-Latinos, and African, Caribbean and Latin American immigrants in the U.S.

Qualifications:

Required
•PhD in Ethnic Studies, Latina/Latino Studies, Sociology, American Studies, History, or similar social science or humanities field.
•Record of working and communicating effectively with colleagues and students.

Preferred
•One to two years of undergraduate teaching experience with a large, diverse student body or in a multicultural setting.
•Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum design, instruction of individuals and groups, and the assessment of learning.
•Awareness and engagement with critical concerns in the discipline and publication record that demonstrates a sustained research focus on Afro-Latinas/os/x.
•A demonstrated record of community involvement related to Afro-Latinas/os/x.

Rank and salary:

Assistant Professor. Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience. The California State University (CSU) provides generous health, retirement and other benefits.

Application Instructions:

Submit the following materials via email to ltnshire@sfsu.edu by November 1, 2019 and please list search # 28.19 in your subject heading (1) letter of intent/interest, (2) current CV, (3) sample of scholarly papers, (4) teaching philosophy regarding pedagogical approaches that address Afro-Latinidad, (5) description of research interests, (6) statement on how your teaching and scholarship align with the Latina/Latino Studies Department’s commitment to fostering an inclusive and diverse academic community, (7) letters of recommendation from three references. Teaching evaluations will be requested at a later date.

Review of applications will continue until the position is filled.

San Francisco State is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate against persons on the basis of race, religion, color, ancestry, age, disability, genetic information, gender, gender identity, gender expression, marital status, medical condition, National origin, sex, sexual orientation, covered veteran status, or any other protected status. Reasonable accommodations will be provided for qualified applicants with disabilities who self-disclose by contacting the Senior Human Resources Manager.

Above text adapted from webpage.

2019 CONCH SHELL NEW WORKS READING SERIES PROGRAM

New Plays by Caribbean-American Playwrights

The Bruce Mitchell Room

520 8th Avenue, 3rd Floor

New York, NY 10018

Click here to reserve your free tickets.

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2019 CONCH SHELL NEW WORKS READING SERIES PROGRAM

We are proud to announce Conch Shell New Works Reading Series 2019 selected works.

BETWEEN GRACE & GAYELLE

by Anton Nimblett

October 5th, 2019 @ 8pm

A young man, caught in the magic time between night and day, wrestles with life and dances with death. 

MISFIT, AMERICA – AN AMERICAN WESTERN WITH COLOR 

by Nelson Diaz-Marcano

October 6th, 2019 @8pm

An interracial couple leads a diverse community as they are forced to protect a Native American teen from a brotherhood of supremacists.

DESTINATION OOOH AAAH YUMMY

by Magaly Colimon-Christopher

October 12th, 2019 @ 4pm

A time bending journey into a young woman’s mind as she struggles to figure out her life’s purpose.

LUCKY

by Phanesia Pharel

October 12th, 2019 @ 7pm

A woman unravels sexual trauma and finds the power of healing through writing.

Text and image adapted from website.

Adjunct Instructor for Caribbean Studies Course

The Department of Africana Studies, of CUNY Brooklyn College, is seeking an adjunct instructor to teach the following course in Fall 2019:

AFST 3349 The Caribbeanization of North America (3 hours, 3 credits)
The formation of Caribbean societies and their impact on the United States. Migration to the United States, its selection process and settlement patterns. The transformation of immigrants in the United States and their transformation of American society.

Africana Studies is interested in candidates whose research area is in the Social Sciences and has experience teaching college level courses in Africana Studies and/or related fields. There is some flexibility in scheduling the time of the course.

Please send the following documents as a pdf file: a cover letter, curriculum vitae and a list of three references to africanastudies@brooklyn.cuny.edu. For more information, please contact the Department Chairperson, Prudence Cumberbatch.

Above text adapted from email.

Recent Publication – sx salon 30: Brother, by David Chariandy

sx salon
Issue 30
February 2019

Issue 30 of sx salon is dedicated to David Chariandy’s second novel, Brother (2017). Brother has received many awards and accolades, such as the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and the Toronto Book Award. To discuss the various dimensions of Chariandy’s novel, sx salon has gathered several voices from Canada and the Caribbean to explore the intricacies of homosocial and diasporic spaces, linearity, and the lines between nostalgia, sentiment, and survival. (Introduction)

sx salon: a small axe literary platform is a digital forum for innovative critical and creative explorations of Caribbean literature, broadly defined. Caribbean creative writing has always wrestled with the idea of an aesthetic form that engages regional and diasporic understandings of our changing realities. As a forum, sx salon aims to stimulate these sensibilities and preoccupations across different literary genres. Initiated in 2010, sx salon appears three times per year (February, June, and October). The journal publishes literary discussions, interviews with writers, reviews of new publications (creative and scholarly), and poetry and prose by Caribbean writers.

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2020-2021 Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program

Application Deadline: 16 September 2019

The 2020-2021 Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is accepting applications from U.S.-citizen academics and professionals through the deadline of September 16th, 2019. Fulbright Scholars are selected for their academic merit and leadership potential to teach, research, and exchange ideas. There are over 450 awards available in more than 130 countries; complete details are located in the Catalog of Awards.

Eligibility criteria, application guidelines, review criteria, as well as other resources are available on the Fulbright website. Fulbright also offers webinars throughout the application season, which provide additional details about the program and allow for audience Q&A participation.

Fulbright offers awards for Teaching, Research, or Teaching and Research in the Caribbean region in the following countries: 

Above text adapted from email.

Recent Publication – Journal of West Indian Literature: Special Issue on Marlon James

Journal of West Indian Literature
Volume 26, Issue 2
November 2018

The Journal of West Indian Literature presents a special issue dedicated to the novels of Marlon James. “From his first novel, John Crow’s Devil, that engages queer sexual identity, religious dogmatism and violence, through his outstanding second novel, The Book of Night Women, that focuses on slavery, racial hegemony and female agency, to The Brief History of Seven Killings, which looks at the political upheaval of the 1970s, transnational crime and popular culture, James has created dramatic renditions of Jamaican history.” (CFP)

The Journal of West Indian Literature (JWIL) is a UWI-led Caribbeanist project invested in highlighting and critically examining the prolific literary production of the Anglophone Caribbean. The journal publishes articles in English that are the result of scholarly research in literary textuality (fiction, poetry, drama, film, theory and criticism) of the English speaking (cricket playing) Caribbean and in translation from other parts of the archipelago.  JWIL also publishes book reviews, and, in time, hopes to include reviews of theatre and film productions.


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