css.php

Recent Publication – Small Axe Volume 22, Issue 3

Small Axe
Volume 22, Issue 3
November 2018

This issue of Small Axe features a discussion section focused on redefining security and insecurity through the centering of the Caribbean. The authors contend with three guiding understandings of security and insecurity: that security and insecurity are deeply located and historically grounded; that security and insecurity are intertwined and constantly produced and reproduced in relation to one another; and the role of creative practice in locating negotiation agency around a specific form and location of security or insecurity.

Small Axe focuses on publishing critical work that examines the ideas that guided the formation of Caribbean modernities. Through the journal many of the conceptions that guided the formation of our Caribbean modernities—conceptions of class, gender, nation, culture, race, for example, as well as conceptions of sovereignty, development, democracy, and so on— receive substantial rethinking. Small Axe aims to enable an informed and sustained debate about the present we inhabit, its political and cultural contours, its historical conditions and global context, and the critical languages in which change can be thought and alternatives reimagined. The journal mainly includes scholarly articles, opinion essays, and interviews, but it also includes literary works of fiction and poetry, visual arts, and reviews.


Cover Art: Miguel Luciano, Pimp My Piragua, 2009.

Table of Contents

Michael K. Walonen, “Violence, Diasporic Transnationalism, and Neo-imperialism in A Brief History of Seven Killings,” 1-12.

Kaneesha Cherelle Parsard, “Barrack Yard Politics: From C. L. R. James’s The Case for West-Indian Self Government to Minty Alley,” 13-27.

Bonnie Thomas, “Rodney Saint-Éloi: Writer and Publisher of the “Whole-World,” 28-36.

Caribbean In/Securities
Patricia Noxolo, Guest editor, (Section) Introduction, 37-46.

Visualities

Translating the Caribbean

Book Discussion: Christina Sharpe, In the Wake: On Blackness and Being

Contributors