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Assistant Professor, Latina/Latino Studies (Tenure-Track)

Application Deadline: October 21, 2019

San Francisco State University’s, Department of Latina/Latino Studies offers an exciting opportunity for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position focused on Afro-Latinidad from a social science or humanities perspective beginning August 2020.

We seek a colleague whose teaching and research interests include a transnational understanding of the intersections of Afro-Latinidad in the United States, the Spanish Caribbean, and Latin America.

About the Department:

The Department of Latina/Latino Studies is a unique liberal arts BA degree program with an emphasis on equity, social justice, and community empowerment focused on developing critical thinking, analytical writing skills, and an area of expertise centered on Latinas/os/x in the U.S. The Latina/Latino Studies Department favors a pan-Latino approach to the study of Chicana/o/x, Mexican, Central American, South American, and Caribbean-American communities in the U.S. We emphasize gender, transnational identities, global economies, social movements, and critical, socially responsible scholarship that links our classrooms to local communities and their empowerment through both our curriculum and our community service learning program.

About the University:

The mission of San Francisco State University is to create and maintain an environment for learning that promotes respect for and appreciation of scholarship, freedom, human diversity, and the cultural mosaic of the City of San Francisco and the Bay Area; to promote excellence in instruction and intellectual accomplishment; and to provide broadly accessible higher education for residents of the region and state, as well as the nation and world. To fulfill its mission, the University is committed to the following goals:

•Attracting, retaining and graduating a highly diverse student body
•Providing disciplinary and interdisciplinary liberal arts and professional education that is academically rigorous and intellectually challenging
•Providing curricula that reflect all dimensions of human diversity, and that encourage critical thinking and a commitment to social justice
•Recruiting, retaining and supporting a diverse faculty whose teaching demonstrates an active engagement with their individual fields of study and whose creative and scholarly work is an extension of the classroom, laboratory or studio
•Employing a staff and administration reflecting the diversity of our student community and the values of the campus;
•Fostering a collegial and cooperative intellectual environment that includes recognition and appreciation of differing viewpoints and promotes academic freedom within the University community; and
•Serving the communities with which its students and faculty are engaged.

Responsibilities:

The position requires undergraduate teaching of courses on the Afro-Latino diaspora, mentoring and advising of graduate and undergraduate students, developing an active ongoing scholarship program in one’s area of specialty, and ongoing committee and service assignments.

Teaching assignments will include the following courses:
LTNS 215: Introduction to Latina/Latino Studies
LTNS 380: Afro-Latina/o Diasporas
LTNS 440: Caribbean Cultures and Spirituality
LTNS 467: Caribbeans in the U.S.: History and Heritage.

Teaching assignments may also include the following and other existing courses:
LTNS 470: Latina/o Immigration to the U.S.
LTNS 278: History of Latinos in the U.S.
The Department supports the creation of additional courses that focus on the broader Afro-Latino diaspora.

The candidate’s research agenda should address how ideas of Blackness and Latinidad have intersected historically and would connect this to contemporary experiences between and among African Americans, Afro-Latinos, and African, Caribbean and Latin American immigrants in the U.S.

Qualifications:

Required
•PhD in Ethnic Studies, Latina/Latino Studies, Sociology, American Studies, History, or similar social science or humanities field.
•Record of working and communicating effectively with colleagues and students.

Preferred
•One to two years of undergraduate teaching experience with a large, diverse student body or in a multicultural setting.
•Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum design, instruction of individuals and groups, and the assessment of learning.
•Awareness and engagement with critical concerns in the discipline and publication record that demonstrates a sustained research focus on Afro-Latinas/os/x.
•A demonstrated record of community involvement related to Afro-Latinas/os/x.

Rank and salary:

Assistant Professor. Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience. The California State University (CSU) provides generous health, retirement and other benefits.

Application Instructions:

Submit the following materials via email to ltnshire@sfsu.edu by November 1, 2019 and please list search # 28.19 in your subject heading (1) letter of intent/interest, (2) current CV, (3) sample of scholarly papers, (4) teaching philosophy regarding pedagogical approaches that address Afro-Latinidad, (5) description of research interests, (6) statement on how your teaching and scholarship align with the Latina/Latino Studies Department’s commitment to fostering an inclusive and diverse academic community, (7) letters of recommendation from three references. Teaching evaluations will be requested at a later date.

Review of applications will continue until the position is filled.

San Francisco State is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate against persons on the basis of race, religion, color, ancestry, age, disability, genetic information, gender, gender identity, gender expression, marital status, medical condition, National origin, sex, sexual orientation, covered veteran status, or any other protected status. Reasonable accommodations will be provided for qualified applicants with disabilities who self-disclose by contacting the Senior Human Resources Manager.

Above text adapted from webpage.

2019 CONCH SHELL NEW WORKS READING SERIES PROGRAM

New Plays by Caribbean-American Playwrights

The Bruce Mitchell Room

520 8th Avenue, 3rd Floor

New York, NY 10018

Click here to reserve your free tickets.

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2019 CONCH SHELL NEW WORKS READING SERIES PROGRAM

We are proud to announce Conch Shell New Works Reading Series 2019 selected works.

BETWEEN GRACE & GAYELLE

by Anton Nimblett

October 5th, 2019 @ 8pm

A young man, caught in the magic time between night and day, wrestles with life and dances with death. 

MISFIT, AMERICA – AN AMERICAN WESTERN WITH COLOR 

by Nelson Diaz-Marcano

October 6th, 2019 @8pm

An interracial couple leads a diverse community as they are forced to protect a Native American teen from a brotherhood of supremacists.

DESTINATION OOOH AAAH YUMMY

by Magaly Colimon-Christopher

October 12th, 2019 @ 4pm

A time bending journey into a young woman’s mind as she struggles to figure out her life’s purpose.

LUCKY

by Phanesia Pharel

October 12th, 2019 @ 7pm

A woman unravels sexual trauma and finds the power of healing through writing.

Text and image adapted from website.

Staceyann Chin

7pm-8:30pm (Q&A and book signing to follow)
1 October 2019 (Tuesday)
BAM Fisher

Fishman Space
Buy tickets here

Unbound: Staceyann Chin

Part of Unbound

In conversation with Eve Ensler

Launch of Crossfire: A Litany for Survival
Co-presented by BAM and Greenlight Bookstore

Renowned LGBTQ poet and spoken word artist Staceyann Chin celebrates the release of her first full-length collection, Crossfire: Litany for Survival. After she reads from her work, Chin is joined in conversation by playwright, performer, and activist Eve Ensler.

An audience Q&A and book signing to follow.

“Staceyann Chin’s Crossfire: A Litany for Survival is a remarkable collection from a dynamic and talented writer, whose urgent storytelling and commanding voice feel vital for our times.” —Edwidge Danticat

Above text and image adapted from webpage.

 

From the Islands to Eastern Parkway: A Transnational History of Carnival with Ray Allen

6:30pm – 8:00pm
24 September 2019 (Tuesday)
Skylight Room (9th Floor) The Graduate Center, CUNY

 
From the Islands to Eastern Parkway: A Transnational History of Carnival
  • Tuesday, September 24, 2019
  • 6:30 PM 8:00 PM
  • Skylight Room (9th Floor), The Graduate Center, CUNY 365 5th Avenue New York, NY, 10016 United States
Ray Allen of Brooklyn College talks about his new book, Jump Up!, the first lengthy study of calypso and steelband music in the African diaspora, the first documented history of Brooklyn’s soca music industry, and the first thorough account of the borough’s Carnival J’ouvert celebration. Q&A follows with Harvey R. Neptune, author of Caliban and the Yankees: Trinidad and the United States Occupation.

 


Presented with the CUNY Graduate Center’s Advanced Research Collaborative and  
The Institute for the African Diaspora in the Americas & Caribbean.

Ray Allen (Brooklyn College) talks about his new book, Jump Up!, the first lengthy study of calypso and steelband music in the African diaspora, the first documented history of Brooklyn’s soca music industry, and the first thorough account of the borough’s Carnival J’ouvert celebration.

Q&A follows with Harvey R. Neptune, author of Caliban and the Yankees: Trinidad and the United States Occupation.

This event is presented with the Graduate Center’s Institute for the African Diaspora in the Americas and Caribbean (IRADAC).

Above text adapted from email.

From Katrina to Michael: Disaster in the 21st-century Circum-Caribbean

20-21 February 2020
Florida State University

CFP Deadline: 30 September 2019 

Keynote speakers:
Yarimar Bonilla (Rutgers University), Laura Wagner (freelance anthropologist), and Mark Schuller (Northern Illinois University and Faculté d’Ethnologie – Université d’Etat d’Haïti)

Conference artist: Édouard Duval Carrié

To mark the 10-year anniversary of the Haitian earthquake, this conference proposes a regional approach to disaster that seeks to draw connections between 21st-century experiences of catastrophe in the circum-Caribbean, including the south-east U.S. and North Florida post-Michael. Continue reading

19th International Conference on Caribbean Literature

“Caribbean Literary Crossings, Critical Crossroads and Cross-Disciplinary Conversations”

13-15th November 2019
Bridgetown, Barbados

CFP Deadline: 15 July 2019 

From the recent treatment of the Windrush generation in Britain to the growing interest in the environmental humanities and the plantationocene, Caribbean literary arts continue to provide insights relevant to our lived experiences. From créolité to cross-cultural dialogue, the boundary-blurring aesthetic of the region is instrumental in throwing into relief fruitful connections important to our understandings of, for example, cultural and socio-political relationships.

Attentive to a region characterised by metaphors of change and interstices, the 19th International Conference on Caribbean Literature seeks to explore how crossroads, crossings and cross-fertilisations continue to be used to figure Caribbean futures. The main aim is to examine the kinds of connections to be developed between, for example, literature and law, speculative fiction and ethics, drama and medicine, poetry and marketing with a view to how these connections can be used to benefit Caribbean development and foster a productive commitment to literature, specifically, and the humanities in general. To this end, papers are therefore invited on topics related, but not limited, to: Continue reading

Book Fiestón: The Crazy Bunch By Willie Perdomo

6:00pm – 9:00pm
7 June 2019
Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute

120 E 125th St, New York, NY 10035
*RSVP, registration is free*

Join us in celebration of  Willie Perdomo’s most recent book, “The Crazy Bunch.” Guest writers Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa, Roberto Carlos Garcia, Felipe Luciano, and John Murillo will be present. The party includes a band, food, book signing, and a special reading of “The Crazy Bunch.” Copies of the book will be available for purchase!

Willie Perdomo, a native of East Harlem, has won praise as “a hip, playful, historically engaged poet whose restlessly lyrical language mixes city life with a sense of the transcendent” (NPR.org). In his fourth collection, The Crazy Bunch, Perdomo returns to his beloved neighborhood to create a vivid, kaleidoscopic portrait of a “crew” coming of age in East Harlem at the beginning of the 1990s. Continue reading

Epic Voices: The Caribbean (Un)Epic with M. NourbeSe Philip

3:00pm – 6:00pm
1 June 2019
Poets House
10 River Terrace, New York, NY 10282
Admission $10, $7 for students and seniors, free to Poets House members.

followed by

Zong!: A Collective Reading with King, Diggs, Henry-Smith & Hunt

6:00pm – 8:00pm
1 June 2019
Poets House
10 River Terrace, New York, NY 10282
Admission Free and open to the public

Poet M. NourbeSe Philip writes: “That ‘micropelago’ of tiny islands that arc in one long ache from Cuba to Guyana to enclose the Caribbean Sea (the Cari Basin) from the encroaching Atlantic Ocean; place and space of massive ‘interruckshuns,’ where tectonic plates of history grind against each other and shards of memory pierce and transfix green islands seeded with the spores of Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indigenous: if places could be said to represent poetic forms or genres, the (un)epic would seem to be the Caribbean’s most natural form.” For Epic Voices: The Caribbean (Un)Epic with M. NourbeSe Philip at 3pm, join Philips as she draws on poets of Caribbean/Cari Basin heritage as she discusses her book Zong!, as well as her manuscript Island Liturgies, in the context of the (un)epic.

This event is co-presented with Belladonna and the Canadian Consulate.

After the (Un)Epic talk, stick around for Zong!: A Collective Reading with King, Diggs, Henry-Smith & Hunt at 6pm. Join Rosamond S. King, LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs, Sean Henry-Smith, and Erica Hunt for a free collective reading/performance of Zong!. The poets use word, song, and bodies to interpret the book, the text of which is based entirely on historical documents relating to a 1781 massacre of 150 Africans on the slave ship Zong.

Above text and images adapted from webpage.

T&T’s “Hero” Lands in New York

Film Screening and Q&A with director, Frances-Anne Solomon

6:30pm 
30 May 2019
Walter Reade Theater
165 West 65th Street, New York, NY 10023
Tickets available here

AND

4:15pm 
2 June 2019
Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center
144 West 65th Street, New York, NY 10023
Tickets available here

Director Frances-Anne Solomon’s acclaimed feature film HERO, inspired by Trinidad and Tobago war hero Ulric Cross, will have its U.S premiere at the 26th New York African Film Festival’s (NYAFF) Opening Night at Lincoln Center. A second screening will take place on June 2nd at 4:15pm at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center. Both screenings will include a Q&A afterward with the director. Tickets are $12-15 per person.  Continue reading

Adjunct Instructor for Caribbean Studies Course

The Department of Africana Studies, of CUNY Brooklyn College, is seeking an adjunct instructor to teach the following course in Fall 2019:

AFST 3349 The Caribbeanization of North America (3 hours, 3 credits)
The formation of Caribbean societies and their impact on the United States. Migration to the United States, its selection process and settlement patterns. The transformation of immigrants in the United States and their transformation of American society.

Africana Studies is interested in candidates whose research area is in the Social Sciences and has experience teaching college level courses in Africana Studies and/or related fields. There is some flexibility in scheduling the time of the course.

Please send the following documents as a pdf file: a cover letter, curriculum vitae and a list of three references to africanastudies@brooklyn.cuny.edu. For more information, please contact the Department Chairperson, Prudence Cumberbatch.

Above text adapted from email.

*UPDATED* 38th Annual West Indian Literature Conference

“HINTERLANDS : Journeys of the Imagination”

17-20th October 2019
University of Guyana, Turkeyen Campus
Georgetown, Guyana

CFP Deadline: 20 June 2019 


Image: “Palace of the Peacock – Homage to Wilson Harris”,
George Simon, Phibert Gajadhar, Anil Roberts,
University of Guyana (2009)

Among the most significant origins of West Indian Literature is The Discovery of Guiana (1597) by one of the “ancestral murderers and poets” (Walcott), Sir Walter Ralegh. The quest for gold, the dream of wealth and power inspired centuries of “history, fable and myth” (Harris), which saw Ralegh himself, and generations of West Indian writers in pursuit of the elusive El Dorado, hidden in the mysteries of the Guianese Hinterland. The “Interiors” (McWatt), the “heartland”, the rainforests – the “hinterland”, is that vast unfathomable region that is largely unexplored, untamed, dynamic; whose definition is yet incomplete and the subject of a continuing journey of exploration and of the imagination.

That is West Indian literature at this time. That is what this conference seeks to interrogate. It is the subject of the conference and a concept of Guyana – the country in which the 38th Annual West Indian Literature Conference will be held.
Continue reading

Recent Publication – sx salon 30: Brother, by David Chariandy

sx salon
Issue 30
February 2019

Issue 30 of sx salon is dedicated to David Chariandy’s second novel, Brother (2017). Brother has received many awards and accolades, such as the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and the Toronto Book Award. To discuss the various dimensions of Chariandy’s novel, sx salon has gathered several voices from Canada and the Caribbean to explore the intricacies of homosocial and diasporic spaces, linearity, and the lines between nostalgia, sentiment, and survival. (Introduction)

sx salon: a small axe literary platform is a digital forum for innovative critical and creative explorations of Caribbean literature, broadly defined. Caribbean creative writing has always wrestled with the idea of an aesthetic form that engages regional and diasporic understandings of our changing realities. As a forum, sx salon aims to stimulate these sensibilities and preoccupations across different literary genres. Initiated in 2010, sx salon appears three times per year (February, June, and October). The journal publishes literary discussions, interviews with writers, reviews of new publications (creative and scholarly), and poetry and prose by Caribbean writers.

Table of Contents Continue reading

Louise Bennett Anthology

CFP Deadline: 1 August 2019

This Call For Papers is for an amazing Louise Bennett anthology that will be published end of 2019 to honor the 100th birthday of Jamaica’s folk icon. The anthology is seeking to gather 100 submissions from as many writers/ poets/ critics/ artists as possible. Questions should be sent to the email address on the flyer (misslou100igdsrco@gmail.com) or to Isis Semaj-Hall directly at isissemajhall@gmail.com

Above text and image adapted from email.

Caribbean Quarterly: Enough!

CFP Deadline: 1 August 2019

Caribbean Quarterly is now accepting submissions for Enough!, an issue dedicated to addressing child sexual abuse (CSA) in Caribbean culture through an examination of regional literature, film, art, music, and life writing. The journal is currently accepting articles (6000 words), poems (2 pages or less), short prose (1500 words or less), personal narratives (1500 words), and art (photographs, paintings, or drawings in jpeg format) focusing on CSA in the Caribbean.

This issue seeks to bring the art and scholarly communities as well as victims/survivors together to address the critical issue of CSA in the Caribbean region by initiating a conversation. This issue hopes to answer some questions, such as: Why is CSA so prevalent in the Caribbean, and what can be done to address it on a social, familial, and governmental level? Can the Caribbean transform its culture of accepting or concealing CSA? What are the historical origins of CSA culture in the Caribbean and can this narrative be altered? Is there a connection between gender and possible victimization in incidents of CSA in the Caribbean?

Some possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • CSA in Caribbean literature, film, art, poetry, music
  • CSA and the Caribbean media
  • Addressing CSA in the Caribbean on a socio-cultural level
  • Families and CSA in the Caribbean
  • Reaching victims/survivors of CSA in the Caribbean
  • Addressing CSA in the Caribbean through education
  • CSA in the Caribbean and the culture of young girls and older men
  • Educating boys and men in the Caribbean on CSA culture
  • Victims of CSA in the Caribbean and gender

Please submit an article proposal of 250 words or less to guest editor Camille Alexander at calexander@uaeu.ac.ae by August 1, 2019. Accepted proposals will receive responses by August 20, 2019 with final manuscripts due by December 1, 2019.

Submissions of prose, poems, art, and personal narratives may be submitted at any time before October 1, 2019; responses will be sent by December 1, 2019. For book review enquiries, please review the book list at http://www.uwi.edu/cq/reviews/booksreview.aspx and contact Caribbean Quarterly editor Kim Robinson-Walcott at kimberly.robinson@uwimona.edu.jm with your book selection preference.

For any additional enquiries about this issue of Caribbean Quarterly, please contact Camille Alexander, Assistant Professor, United Arab Emirates, University, calexander@uaeu.ac.ae.

Above text adapted from webpage.